Yesterday, I ate the best vegetarian breakfast sandwich, bought a purple shirt, played my first Philly show, bought drugs off of a kind-of stranger (you’re the homie) and recorded Black Diamond’s new EP. I love my friends. I love my life. I’d risk my life to play some music with you guys any day.

Yesterday, I ate the best vegetarian breakfast sandwich, bought a purple shirt, played my first Philly show, bought drugs off of a kind-of stranger (you’re the homie) and recorded Black Diamond’s new EP. I love my friends. I love my life. I’d risk my life to play some music with you guys any day.

letstalkabouted
And one of the things that often gets lost in discussions of depression is that you know it’s ridiculous. You know it’s ridiculous while you’re experiencing it. You know that most people manage to listen to their messages and eat lunch and organize themselves to take a shower and go out the front door and that it’s not a big deal, and yet you are nonetheless in its grip and you are unable to figure out any way around it.
Andrew Solomon: Depression, the secret we share (x)
jtotheizzoe
Technology is usually fairly neutral. It’s like a hammer, which can be used to build a house or to destroy someone’s home. The hammer doesn’t care. It is almost always up to us to determine whether the technology is good or bad.

Noam Chomsky, answering a question from an 11-year-old named Honor on whether technology is always good. It’s the perfect answer, if you ask me.

Chomsky’s words come from Does My Goldfish Know Who I Am?, a collection of young people’s questions answered by great scientists and thinkers. It’s ample proof that many of our greatest questions are simple ones, and their answers delight minds both brilliant and new. 

Check out more great excerpts from the book at Brain Pickings.

(via jtotheizzoe)